Regnum Christi

Regnum Christi

Five Legionaries Make First Vows of Poverty, Chastity, and Obedience

On September 5th, 2020, on the Feast of St. Teresa of Calcutta, five novices at the Legionaries of Christ’s Novitiate and College of Humanities in Cheshire, Connecticut, made their first professions of the vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience. For Br. Ricardo Gurrola, LC, Br. John Wilson, LC, Br. Eduardo Urdaneta, LC, Br. Elijah McLellan, LC, and Br. Raul Espinoza, LC,  Saturday’s profession marked the end of their two-year journey as novices who had left the path of the world and embarked on a new way of growing closer to Christ while discerning the next steps in God’s plan for them. As brothers who have made their professions, they are now officially considered members of the congregation in the eyes of the Church, and continue their journey of formation and preparation for the priesthood as humanists.

“During the novitiate the novices discern and delve into their vocation, they form a passionate love for Christ, and as time goes by, they acquire the virtues necessary for religious life.” Explains Fr. Joseph Brickner, LC, novice director, “Novitiate is like the three years that the apostles spent with Christ; listening to him, observing him, praying with him, and yes – even being challenged by him.  The first profession of temporal vows is the leaving of the boat and nets on the shore and responding to Christ who is saying, ‘Come, follow me.’”

Fr. Timothy Walsh, LC, rector of the Novitiate and College of Humanities, explains the meaning of the step the brothers have taken, “Professions is the day on which the young man commits his life entirely to God in an act of self-giving love. By professing the evangelical counsels (vows) of poverty, chastity, and obedience, he publicly expresses his desire to follow Christ more closely and be his disciple in a more committed way. In this sense, professions are the door into religious life in the Catholic Church.”

The brothers finished their two years of preparation for professions with an eight-day silent retreat, which was directed and preached this year by Fr. Emilio Diaz-Torre, LC, who lived and worked in the United States for many years before taking on a new assignment as territorial director in Monterrey, Mexico. He now lives and works in the newly established diocese of Cancun, Mexico.

On a practical level, the newly professed brothers will now be considered “humanists,” and will begin college level studies of humanities, including classical and modern languages, history, art, literature, and science. Fr. Timothy explained that within this context, they will each strive to become a man for the mission, and this will lead them along a path of discovering the human heart, starting with their own, especially by growing in self-knowledge. They will strive to put Christ at the center of their lives and the world around them by searching for the Lord’s presence in new ways and places. They will live out their mission through an ever-deepening identification with their individual religious and Legionary identity. This journey is made together, in company of the community of his fellow professed.

Explaining the link between professions and the preparation for the priesthood, Fr. Timothy states that “Through priestly ordination, a man is configured to Christ at the deepest level; he thus becomes an alter Christus, another Christ. Professions is a sort of “tilling the soil” of a young man’s soul which helps prepare him to receive this incredible gift.”

Number 18 of the Constitutions of the Legionaries of Christ explains it this way:

Legionaries, through the profession of the evangelical counsels of poverty, chastity and obedience by public vow,

1° consecrate themselves to God more intimately, following Christ who, virgin and poor, redeemed and sanctified the world by his obedience to the Father, even to the death of the cross;

2° seek to conform their hearts to Christ’s and make the Kingdom of God present in the world;

3° dedicate their entire lives consciously and eagerly to serve the Lord, the Church, the Congregation, Regnum Christi and all God’s children.

For each of the five brothers, all between the ages of 19 and 20 years old, the call of God that brought them to become professed brothers of the Legionaries of Christ is something they began to hear long ago.

Br. Ricardo Gurrola, LC from Los Angeles, California, shares that, “I don’t think there’s a moment in my life when I didn’t want to be a priest and I didn’t feel God’s call to be a priest. I always felt God calling me in simple little ways. When I was 12, I decided to join the apostolic school and really I kept saying my yes to God and taking the little steps he wanted me to take.”  For him, the act of professing the evangelical counsels is all encompassing.  He explains, “By making the vow of poverty I am telling God he is my only treasure. He is all that I want from this world. By making the vow of chastity I am telling him that he is my only love. By making the vow of obedience I am telling him that His will is my will, and it’s all I want to do in this life.”

Br. Raul Espinoza, LC,  of Paris, California, first heard God’s call through social media. “I ran into the Legionaries of Christ on YouTube, watching a Legionary priest talking about Mary.  The next suggested video was a Legionary priest speaking to married couples with such deep joy and depth of faith.”  Br. Raul started researching the order, and got in contact with Fr. John Curran, the Legionaries vocations director at the time.  A couple of months later, in 2018, he visited the seminary in Cheshire for a Test Your Call retreat, which was life changing for him, and he entered the candidacy program that summer. He explains his experience of making his profession of vows by sharing, “I found a treasure in the Legionaries of Christ, and now I am selling all that I have in order to take this treasure for myself.”

Br. John Wilson, LC, of Orr, Ontario, credits the parish priest he had growing up as a defining influence on his vocation through the way he reached young people with sports, joy, fun, and holiness. At 15, he visited Sacred Heart Apostolic School in Rolling Prairie, Indiana, and recalled that “while I was there, I had this powerful experience. Kneeling in the chapel before our Lord, I felt him almost drawing me towards the tabernacle with a simple, but profound call: Follow me.”  He entered the apostolic school and finished his high school there before entering the novitiate.

Born in Venezuela, then moving to Ft. Lauderdale, Florida as a teenager, Br. Eduardo Urdaneta, LC, found the desire to become a priest take root in him at 15, after being on retreat with the Legionaries of Christ. The retreat ignited a new life of prayer in him.  A month later he and his family moved to the United States. He remembers one night, not long after, when he was praying his rosary in the kitchen, reflecting on his life and thanking God for all his gifts. He felt the deep interior desire to give back to God, and experienced the call to give God his life as a priest. He feels a deep certainty about his decision to become a Legionary of Christ, stating “I grew up with this spirituality and I am passionate about the mission.”

Growing up in New Hampshire, Br. Elijah McLellan, LC, always thought he would join the army like his father. At one point, his parish priest asked him if he had ever considered the priesthood, and that opened him up to thinking about it. He visited the novitiate in Cheshire, and after a week of prayer and discernment, away from technology and distractions, he says he “felt a sure call to follow God in the priesthood.” To Br. Elijah, making his first profession of vows means, “to give my life to God, to totally abandon everything to God, and to hand my whole life and my total self to him.”

The current pandemic prevented the Legionaries of Christ from inviting all friends and family to join them in person for the Professions Mass at the Seminary, but the live-stream of the Mass on the Legionaries of Christ Facebook page allowed about 8,800 people to watch and pray with the brothers as they made their vows.

Fr. Shawn Aaron, LC, territorial director for the Legionaries of Christ in the Territory of North America, presided at the Mass and gave the homily.  His words were directed at the next steps that the brothers will take as they journey on in religious life.

Referring to the first reading from the book of Samuel, chapter 3:1-10, he told them, “There is a strange little phrase in the first reading, ‘Samuel was not yet familiar with the Lord.’ In a particular way from this point forward, everyone who encounters you must discover a certain hallmark in you of someone who is familiar with the Lord. They must encounter in you someone that they know has a relationship with the Lord, that listens to his voice, ponders his word, and adjusts according to his step”

Continuing with a reflection on the second reading from St. Paul’s letter to the Philippians chapter 3:8-14, he stated that “when we are familiar with the Lord it allows us to discern the value of things correctly.  Like St. Paul said, ‘I have considered all things and none of them compare to the surpassing glory of Christ, of knowing him, but more importantly of being known by him. He has grasped me. I am in his hands and he will never let me go.’” He wanted the brothers to clearly know that they will not earn heaven, that it is not a righteousness of their own making, but it is a righteousness, a holiness, that comes from faith in the Lord, from a particular way of setting their hearts on him alone,  and being conformed to his resurrection by way of being conformed to his death.

Concluding with words about the Gospel passage which described how a grain of wheat must fall into the ground and die in order to live and bear fruit, Fr. Shawn said that in being familiar with the Lord, being conformed to him, and being particularly conformed to Him in his death, a death that is an expression of love, and therefore a fruitful death, Legionaries must die daily to themselves. “In religious life, the fathers and brothers have to learn to say yes to things they don’t to say yes to, and how to say no to things they don’t want to say no to.” He echoed St. Paul’s words that “I learn how to let go of all things,” going on to explain that this means “not just the good things, but you even need to let go of the weaknesses and imperfections in yourself and in those around you.  In case you haven’t noticed, the Legion is not perfect, but it is an instrument of God. The Lord will work through it. I have to let go of the imperfections that I will sometimes see, knowing he is leading me to himself, even by way of the imperfect in me and around me. Because I have hope in the power of the resurrection I can die, because there’s a force that’s even more powerful at work by which Our Lord rose from the dead.  There is a love stronger than death. His death is the surrender of love. Love engulfs death, and because it does, it is fruitful.”

The Legionaries prayerfully invite all who would like to give a gift to support the newly professed brothers, and all of the Legionaries of Christ in formation for the priesthood, to consider doing so through a donation to the Novitiate and College of Humanities.

Anyone who would like to get to know the Legionaries of Christ and start discerning a potential vocation is invited to explore their discernment website and contact the congregation by email.

The full video of the Professions Mass is available here, and a collection of photos can be found here.

Below is a brief interview with the five brothers just before they made their professions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Living the Dream: Twenty-Five Years of Pastoral and Vocation Work

Tammy Grady has been working in the ministry of vocation awareness and discernment for most of her consecrated life. Ever since becoming a Consecrated Woman of Regnum Christi twenty-five years ago, she has felt God leading her towards vocation work in one way or another. And her current position as the Associate Vocation Director for Women Vocations for the Diocese of Dallas, Spiritual Director at both Benedictine College and SMU Catholic Campus Ministry and teaching Theology of the Body to young adults after being certified from the Theology of the Body Institute in Pennsylvania are just some of her latest roles in a life dedicated to helping young people discover God’s unique plan for their lives.

What does it take to be a vocation director, and carry out the important task of accompanying young adults as they discern God’s will for their future?  Tammy believes that while it’s important to have proper training and studies in theology, the spiritual life, discernment of spirits and on-going formation in order to be better equipped to help guide others, what is equally important is that, as Vocation Director, she also has a strong prayer life, her own spiritual director and mentors, and a sincere love for the young people whom the Lord entrusts to her. “It’s important to really care for the candidate or directee and to try to see them as Christ sees them,” says Tammy. Her role involves learning how to listen well, being attentive to the discernment of spirits in the heart of the other, and helping the directee to develop her own relationship with the Lord and learn how to detect His voice and the Movements of the Holy Spirit in her heart and in her life. “I also think that experience has a lot to do with it. Your own personal experience of discerning, and the more experience that you gain in helping others to discern prepares you,” says Tammy. “When I look back over my life, I think it’s been my own personal prayer, the experiences that I had and learned through my own spiritual direction, growing more aware of how to detect the discernment of spirits, and accompanying so many others over the years in their walk that have really given me both life and spiritual experiences which have proven to be invaluable for my own mission.”

Tammy’s own discernment to the consecrated life within Regnum Christi deeply influences her current vocation work. For Tammy, her decision to give two years to the Church in volunteer work was the first step of discernment towards the consecrated life. “No matter what vocation we are called to, our baptism calls us to be a self-gift and to serve others,” says Tammy. “My years as a missionary really opened my heart to the beauty of a life dedicated to self-giving. Building upon this experience, a few years later the Lord let me to see the immense beauty and joy that comes with dedicating oneself to God as the Bride of Christ and mother to spiritual children.” The charism of the call to evangelize and to build Christ’s Kingdom on earth, particularly on an international level, led her to Regnum Christi.

But the key to Tammy’s own discernment to the consecrated life, and in her life in general, was focusing first on building a personal relationship with Christ. “For my own discernment, what helped the most, was that I was not so much looking to discern, as I was just looking to grow in relationship with God,” says Tammy. “So as I opened my heart to the Lord, and grew more in a personal relationship with him, I started to fall in love with him, then it was He who led me down the path of discernment and towards Regnum Christi, and it really was him that was moving me and giving me the grace to respond.”

And this is precisely the attitude – one of radical openness to a personal relationship with God – that Tammy encourages in the young people she accompanies through the process of discernment. While her ministry often involves coordinating specific vocation-centered events, such as weekend come-and-sees and Marian dinners, which give university students and young adults the opportunity to meet different religious sisters and consecrated women and experience different forms of the consecrated life, her main objective is to provide a space for a relationship with God to take root and be nourished in the hearts of those she accompanies. “Spiritual exercises, retreats about knowing how to be open to bringing God more into their lives, doing pilgrimages – these help young people take time in silence and reflection to see and listen where God could be leading them in their life,” says Tammy. “Retreats, doing apostolic work, and going on pilgrimages really take people out of their everyday environment, and enable them to give back to others, allow God to work in their life, and allow them to have a spirit of openness and trust.”

Creating these opportunities for young women to experience the consecrated life and nurture a relationship with God is particularly important to Tammy, who saw a gap in the discernment resources for women. “There are a lot of opportunities for those discerning the priesthood, but not as many for women discerning the consecrated life.” For this reason, Tammy finds herself as a point person for many young women, not just within the Diocese of Dallas, but throughout Texas and in other areas of the United States, who are seeking information about particular orders, prayer resources, spiritual direction, and, as she puts it, “anything that could help them to see where the Lord could possibly be leading them.”

For Tammy, this is what vocation work means – not simply guiding someone towards a decision to a specific state of life, but accompanying them on their journey towards a closer relationship with God:

“One of the things that I see about my work in vocations is that I don’t really consider it or label it as vocation work, but rather pastoral work, because really, the human heart is looking for God. The general vocation is really a life of holiness, union with God, and friendship with him. The specific vocation – whether you’re being called to some form of consecrated life or the married life – is more of your own particular path. So with my work, yes, it has to do with specific vocation discernment, but also just helping students and young women and young men to know God more and to trust in His love.”

For Tammy, accompanying young people along their discernment journey is an honor and a gift. “I feel like I’m walking on sacred ground, helping them to see where the Lord has been leading them,” she says. Throughout her twenty-five years of consecrated life, she has journeyed with women on their walk towards their vocation as a Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi, Consecrated Virgins within a diocese or a religious sister within a variety of different religious orders. “All of them have been a great blessing to me,” says Tammy. “It’s just been encouraging to see that God still calls, and that there are still young women who want to be open to become the Bride of Christ in this world and offer themselves to God, to bring about His Kingdom on earth.”

Tammy has also helped women discern their vocation to Holy Matrimony through Christian marriage.  “I’ve been very impressed by young women who have taken time to discern where God is calling them and in their openness discover that He is not calling them to the consecrated life, but to married life as a wife and mother. Their personal relationship with God leads them towards a commitment in seeking to make a difference in the world as an apostle; either as a Regnum Christi member and/or a strong active member of the local Church coupled with preparing themselves for the beautiful vocation of being a wife and mother in the world.”

While the COVID-19 crisis has created new challenges for Tammy’s vocation work, which she believes is better accomplished through face-to-face meetings and in-person relationships, she has noticed a benefit that has come from this unprecedented time as well: lockdowns, quarantines, and the general slowing down of everyday life necessitated by the pandemic have created more space for contemplation and discernment in the lives of the young people with whom she works. “People have more time for reflecting, and I find more people reaching out for discernment and asking deeper questions about life and the future,” says Tammy. “While it’s not the best platform, technical platforms have been useful in connecting with these young people and even serve as a forum for retreats, small group sharing, prayer moments and Q & A sessions.”

On Sept 1st, 2020 Tammy celebrated her 25th Anniversary of Consecrated life to Christ her Bridegroom and King. Reflecting on many of those years being involved with vocation work, Tammy can say that she has never tired of the ministry of accompanying young people through the journey of discernment; in fact, she considers vocation work her dream mission. “Really, I feel right now that I am kind of living a little bit of the dream in what I do,” says Tammy. “It’s beautiful to be able to help people to discover where the Holy Spirit and Christ are working in their life. There are young people still today who have a great heart in wanting to know where the Lord could be leading them, to put God first in their life, and make a difference in this world. To be able to play a role, no matter how small, in this process is a gift that God has granted me and I am forever grateful.”

 

 

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The Ministry of Building Community at Holy Spirit Prep

Father Juan José Hernández, LC, has been eager for the new school year to start. Beginning his seventh year as the Head Chaplain at Holy Spirit Preparatory School in Atlanta, Georgia, he’s part of a campus ministry team that includes two other chaplains, as well as teachers and lay people, all working together to minister to the spiritual needs of the school’s students, staff, faculty, and parents. And, according to Father Juan José, one of the main spiritual needs of all those he serves is the longing for community.

As a small college prep school with students from pre-kindergarten to 12th grade, Holy Spirit Prep strives to create a close-knit faith community dedicated to Catholic values and education, and it’s this caring, communal environment that Father Juan José believes is so important to the development of young people today. Normally, he would start his days on campus with morning Mass for the students, teachers and parents that arrive early, and spend the rest of his time building personal relationships with each and every student, having conversations, hearing confessions, attending after-school activities and sporting events or visiting with families. “I try to see as many kids as I can, with the intention of seeing everybody,” says Father Juan José. “Some students will definitely come by on a regular basis, be it for confession, or just to talk, and I like to be available, but also very intentional, to make sure that I’m at least trying to reach out to everybody.”

Building relationship with every student in the school through personal contact and communication can be challenging at the best of times, but the COVID-19 crisis, and the sudden closure of Holy Spirit Prep in the spring, made Father Juan José’s job of cultivating community that much harder. “The greatest issue facing the students, in the context of the pandemic, is not having that communication, those relationships with the other students,” says Father Juan José. “With the campus ministry team, and with the chaplains in a special way, it’s very natural there at school for the students to stop by, for confession or just to catch up, to talk about life, a moral question, difficulties they’re having at home. Just not having that… that isolation is very difficult.”

However, Father Juan José didn’t let the COVID pandemic – or the school closure – stop him from continually reaching out to try to create spaces of encounter and relationship with the current and past students and families of Holy Spirit Prep. During the first weeks of the pandemic, when the school initially sent its students home, Father Juan José spent much of his time performing house blessings for the families who were now suddenly self-isolating. And during the summer, he was busy continuing the relationships he had been building before the school had shut down. “I’ve spent a lot of my time this summer meeting up with alumni, reaching out, phone calls, or just getting together for dinner – finding ways to visit families, and creating opportunities for parents and students to come together,” says Father Juan José. One of those opportunities was an in-person graduation that the school was able to hold at the end of the school year, while still maintaining the social-distancing restrictions in place. “It’s a small enough school that we were able to get everybody together, something the students really wanted,” says Father Juan José. “They did not want another virtual ceremony, another virtual class. They wanted to do it in-person, and it was great that everybody came together, being able to keep the restrictions that we were given, and actually have an in-person graduation that was very meaningful for the students. It was a great witness to the importance that they give to our community.”

Father Juan José credits his own upbringing for helping him understand, and minister to, the universal longing for community that he encounters in his students. The third of four children, Father Juan José grew up in a faithful Catholic family in Puerto Rico, and it was in this domestic church that he cultivated an awareness of and appreciation for the importance of community. “Just coming from a good Catholic home, just seeing what family life is like, it’s been a blessing,” says Father Juan José. “I’ve seen a lot of suffering of families… and just having that experience of my own family life that, although it wasn’t perfect, was persevering helps gives perspective to the students.”

But perhaps what helps Father Juan José connect most with the young people to whom he ministers is his own experience as a young adult and university student. Before becoming a Legionary, Father Juan José was enrolled at Georgia Tech, where he was pursuing a degree in engineering. Part way through his studies, he realized that God was calling him towards a different path, and he left the school and his aspirations for a career in engineering to enter the Legion of Christ. This experience – of having been accepted into an extremely competitive field at a highly-ranked school, and instead, choosing to enter the religious life – is one that provides Father Juan José with insight into his students’ own dreams of success, as well as a perspective on what truly matters. “I explain that there are things that are beyond success and money… being an engineer and creating the latest technology. All these things, sooner or later, they fade,” says Father Juan José. “I’ve been where they are, had those experiences, and yet I see something that’s more important. I think it helps kind of open a door of conversation where I can connect with them, so even if they do continue to get that engineering job or go to medical school, or whatever it is, they are at least going knowing that that’s just a means, and not an end. So that particular college experience, and my own reason for leaving that and entering religious life, has always been helpful, year after year, when I share that with the students.”

And for Father Juan José, it’s through those personal and genuine conversations with his students where he really gets to know who they truly are as well. “They’re so authentic in many ways, and you can get an insight into what’s in their hearts. It’s amazing to see that beneath all the masks of their Instagram posts, their TikTok videos, and their concern for what people think, deep down, as you talk to them, you discover that they long to live for others, to live sacrifice, to be courageous, and they’ll say it in as many words if you stick around long enough to have that conversation,” says Father Juan José. “And in those conversations, to see that and hear that over and over, the goodness that’s in people – despite their failings, despite their current problems, despite the trouble they’re getting in at school or at home – deep down, everybody is good, and everybody desires something good. And you can see the mark of God in the soul of each one of those students.”

Holy Spirit Prep is returning to in-person instruction this August, and Father Juan José, along with the faculty, staff, and the rest of the campus ministry team, can’t wait to see the students face-to-face once again. “We’re making great efforts to actually have in-person classes, because we all share the same mission. It’s not just the chaplain, but the teachers, the administrators, see the value of being able to form our students with that personal contact,” says Father Juan José. “Not having that has been hard, but what we’re hoping is that we can restart some of these things, and think of smaller, spontaneous things that we can do, so we continue building up that community. It’s so important, especially for young people, to have that community, to find other people who think like they think, who long for the same things, who can build each other up, and that’s what I’m looking forward to.”

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Marlene Torres: Newly Consecrated in Regnum Christi

On Saturday, August 22, Marlene Torres Espinoza consecrated her life to God, making her first temporary vows in the Society of Apostolic Life of the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi, after two years of candidacy.

The ceremony took place in the chapel of the Consecrated Women’s formation center of Monterrey, Mexico, and was presided over by Fr. Paul Lara, LC, territorial director of the Legionaries of Christ of Monterrey; Fr. Arturo Guzmán, LC, and Fr. Ignacio Buisán, LC, the chaplain of the candidacy, participated in the Eucharistic celebration.

Carmen Ramírez, territorial director of the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi of Monterrey, received Marlene’s vows. Marlene consecrated herself to the love of Christ and dedicated her life totally and exclusively to Him and to the proclamation of His Kingdom.

During the homily, Fr. Ignacio said to Marlene: “After two years as a candidate you are taking this step that God is inviting you to take, which is undoubtedly a step of faith, but most of all a step of love. It is a love that seeks to be sustained by Love, and that desires to abandon itself to the constant tender and faithful love of God, because this love is our security.”

He continued, “The prophet Hosea, however, speaks of the unfaithful wife, whom He leads to the desert to speak to her heart. It sounds harsh that the wife is unfaithful, but it is very realistic; because our love does not stop being a fragile, fearful, hesitant, doubtful love And yet He says to you: ‘I will espouse you to me’. He takes you to the desert which could be a good analogy for your candidacy. Four enthusiastic candidates started two years ago, each with their own characteristics. You have had to walk a good part of the way alone: in the desert. You were the representative of the second-year candidates. However, God has spoken to your heart during these years because that is why the spouse was taken to the desert: to speak to her heart: through the spiritual exercises retreat, classes, days of retreat, triduums, spiritual directions, apostolic experiences, through sister candidates and formators, He has taken you to the desert to speak to your heart and, it seems that He has convinced you.

“The step you are now taking is not random. It is a step that at some point your heart had already taken, in a way you are doing publicly and solemnly what you had surely already done in secret, which is in the realm of God’s faithfulness”.

Finally he said: “God has set his eyes on you, He has invited you to a life of consecration to do great things, to love your family even more, your sisters in community, your brothers  who are consecrated in the Legion and in Regnum Christi, and so many people that God is going to put on your path so that you can present them to the Lord”.

At the end of the ceremony Marlene offered the Blessed Virgin a bouquet of flowers entrusting her consecration into the hands of Mary.

Marlene Torres Espinoza, was born in Michoacán, Mexico, on December 8, 1990. She was a member of ECYD, and a Regnum Christi Missionary in Acapulco and Morelia, Mexico. She studied Psychology at the Universidad Anahuac Mexico, South Campus. She completed her candidacy in Monterrey, N.L. and will now carry out her apostolate at Himalaya International School Monterrey, as a High School Formation Instructor.

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New Territorial Councilors Named for the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi

On May 25, 2020 Nancy Nohrden, the General Director of the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi, named the new Territorial Councilors for the North American Territory. Their role is to assist the Territorial Director, newly appointed Kathleen Murphy in the governance and decision making for the ten communities of Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi living and serving in this territory.

The four councilors are:

  • Glory Darbellay, First Councilor and member of the Territorial Directive College
  • Naoise Johnston
  • Mary Smith
  • Melanie Zoll

Glory Darbellay

Glory Darbellay was born in 1974, grew up in Saskatchewan, Canada, and entered consecrated life over twenty five years ago in 1994. She obtained a Bachelors degree in Education and Development, and an Ecclesial Masters degree in Religious Science.  Her ministries have included youth ministry, adult pastoral ministry, and national director for Regnum Christ Mission Corps in North America. She served as first councilor on the territorial council for the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi in North America and as a member of the Regnum Christi Territorial Committee from 2012 – 2015. Currently, she lives in Washington DC, serving as the local director for the community, chaplain for the Regnum Christi women’s section, and is dedicated mainly to spiritual direction and retreat ministry for women. As the first councilor she is also a member of the Territorial Directive College for the Regnum Christi Federation in North America.

 

Naoise Johnston

Naoise Johnston was born in 1971 and grew up in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. With a degree in Philosophy and English from the University of Saskatchewan (1995) and a Masters in Information Studies from the University of Toronto (1997), she worked in a variety of capacities in Canada, the US and Ireland before entering consecrated life in Regnum Christi in 2002, in Dublin, Ireland. After completing her religious formation in Rhode Island, she served there in Mater Ecclesiae College until 2015 in various capacities: accreditation liaison, professor, librarian, and, community director of the Consecrated Women. During her time in Atlanta as director of the territorial community (2015-2018) and in Washington DC (2018-present) in pastoral ministry, she also served as the first councilor on the territorial council for the Consecrated Women in North America. Consequently, she served as a member of North America’s Regnum Christi Territorial Committee (2015-2019) and Territorial Directive College (2019-2020). As of July 2020, she will live in the Cincinnati Community and be dedicated full-time to the ongoing formation and mission assignment projection of the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi and the territorial efforts to provide leadership strengthening resources for the whole Federation.

 

Mary Smith

Mary Smith was born in 1971 and grew up in Southern California as one of 9 children. After attending San Diego State University, where she studied nursing, she began to experience a tug on her heart to give her life for others. In 1993 she gave a year as a Regnum Christi missionary in Overbrook Academy, Rhode Island. She then consecrated her life within Regnum Christi in 1994, then obtained a Bachelors degree in Education and Development in preparation for her pastoral activity in Regnum Christi. She served in youth and adult ministry in Hungary, Slovakia, Austria, Italy, and back home in the United States. For the past 10 years she has been serving in the Washington D.C. area ministering to youth and families. She also served as a councilor on the Territorial Council for the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi in North America from 2012 – 2015. She is currently dedicated to accompanying and forming women through spiritual direction, leading small groups, leadership training within Walking with Purpose, preaching, and guiding retreats.

 

Melanie Zoll

Melanie Zoll was born in 1977 and grew up in Westphalia, Germany as the third of five children. After high school she was a Regnum Christi missionary in Mexico, Guadalajara. She consecrated her life to God within Regnum Christi in 1998 and obtained a Bachelor’s Degree in Education and Development and an Ecclesial Masters degree in Religious Sciences. She has served in youth ministry all over Germany, running Challenge girls clubs, retreats and mentoring. In 2013 she served in Dublin, Ireland in Woodlands Academy as a religion teacher and instructor of formation. She also studied theology at the Benedict XVI University in Heiligenkreuz, Austria specializing in Theology of the Body. In 2017 she went to Budapest, Hungary as the director of the community of the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi for a year and served as a councilor for the Territorial Council for the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi in Europe from 2016-2018. She is currently serving and mentoring young adults and women in Dallas, Texas.

New Territorial Councilors Named for the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi Read More »

Kathleen Murphy Appointed as New North American Territorial Director for the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi: Sonia Baldwin Named as General Administrator

Nancy Nohrden, as general director, and with the consent of her council, has appointed Kathleen Murphy as territorial director of the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi in the North American Territory. She fills the role that was vacated by Nancy Nohrden when she was elected as general director of the society of apostolic life in March. Her appointment will take effect in June 2020, with Naoise Johnson, the interim-territorial director continuing to fill the role until then. As territorial director, Kathleen will also form part of the Territorial Directive Committee of the Regnum Christi Federation.

The Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi in the North American territory will be holding a consultation leading up to the appointment of Kathleen’s new territorial council sometime in the next weeks. The general director has also appointed Sonia Baldwin, who has been serving as the territorial administrator of the North American Territory to be the new general administrator of the Society of Apostolic Life, replacing Beatrice Pimentel.

Kathleen Murphy: New North American Territorial Director 

Born in Nova Scotia, Canada, on July 18, 1975, Kathleen Murphy is the second of ten children and has been consecrated for twenty-five years. Her brother, Fr Thomas Murphy, LC, is a Legionary of Christ. Kathleen spent two years in formation in Rhode Island then did her apostolic internship in California, travelling the west coast of the US and Canada, giving retreats and accompanying young women who were discerning their vocation. She completed her formation in Mexico and Rhode Island. She spent eleven years in Atlanta, GA serving at Pinecrest Academy as a formation instructor and mentoring to high school girls.

Kathleen then served the Cincinnati locality from 2012 as the community director of the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi and also as a spiritual director for the women’s section and for young professionals. She spent a year in Spain 2015-16 to help with the transition and accompaniment of the Consecrated Women in the studies stage of their formation. During that same year, she served on the international spiritual life commission for the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi. She returned for a second term as the director of the Cincinnati community.

Kathleen has been serving as a member of the Territorial Council for the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi since 2018.  This past year she served as the community director of the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi in Chicago. Kathleen has a Bachelors in Education and Development from the Anahuac University and is currently studying a Masters in Spiritual Accompaniment and Vocational Discernment from the University of Comillas.

The Role of the Territorial Director

The territorial directors in the Society of Apostolic Life of the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi are appointed by the general director, with the consent of her council, for a period of three years, according to number 125 of the constitutions. They have authority over all the houses and works of the Society of Apostolic Life in the territory, in accord with universal law and the proper law. (Constitutions 95, §2).  The territorial director also forms part of the Territorial Directive College of the Regnum Christi Federation.

The priorities of the territorial directors according to number 128 of the constitutions are:

  1. to direct and accompany the directors of the houses;
  2. to see to it that the directors of apostolic works receive adequate accompaniment;
  3. to be close to the communities and to the Consecrated Women in order to listen to them, to support them and to see to it that they have the means which will help them most in their formation and apostolate;
  4. to maintain a continuous dialogue with the other areas of government and apostolate of the Regnum Christi Federation in regard to planning, apostolate and finances;
  5. to favor an adequate insertion of the Society in the ecclesial, cultural and social context of the country or of the various countries of the territory;
  6. to foster communion and maintain relationships with the ecclesiastical hierarchy;
  7. to safeguard the healthy economy of the Society in the territory, assuring that the communities and the works of apostolate of the Society have the necessary economic support.

Sonia Baldwin, General Administrator

Nancy Nohrden, general director, has appointed Sonia Baldwin, who is the current territorial administrator of the North American Territory residing in Atlanta, as general administrator for a period of three years beginning on June 1st . Sonia will continue to serve the North American territory for a year while a new territorial administrator is appointed and trained. The transition and organization of the general administration of the Society and the territorial administration of North America is currently underway.

Sonia was born in Australia April 4, 1981 and grew up in the city of Newcastle. After studying Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, she moved to Sydney to work in this field. A few years later she changed paths, joined Regnum Christi, started working in adult faith formation for the Archdiocese of Sydney, Australia and started the first ECYD club in the city as part of her Regnum Christi apostolate. Wanting to discern her vocation to consecrated life in Regnum Christi, she moved to the U.S. where she was consecrated March 25th 2006 at 24 years of age.

During her years of formation and apostolate at Mater Ecclesiae College in Greenville RI, 2006-2011, she completed her bachelors in Religious and Pastoral Studies, taught at the formation center, supported fundraising, and provided IT support for the college. After that she moved to Chicago for 5 years where she worked in Everest Academy Lemont as a formation instructor and helped with ECYD youth work and networking with the Archdiocese of Chicago. She also spent time on road teams to Minnesota and Toronto, Canada.

She has been living in Atlanta serving the Consecrated Women in North American as their territorial administrator, a role she began in 2014. During that time she finished studying a Masters in Nonprofit Administration from North Park University in Chicago. She was involved with the Regnum Christi Territorial Committee since 2015 as part of the administration team and finance committee and helped work on the strategic plan for Regnum Christi in the North American territory. A major part of her role was working to plan and implement the financial autonomy of the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi and support the startup of the Regnum Christi Federation.

The Role of the General Administrator

The general administrator is elected by the General Assembly for a period of six years. At the end of that period she may be re-elected for a second six-year term. (Constitutions 146 § 1). The General Assembly of the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi, which took place from January 24 to March 6, decided, with the approval of the Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life, that the general administrator be elected by the general director with the consent of her council, having heard the opinion of the territorial directors.

The general duties of the administrator are (1) to manage the society of apostolic life’s assets, under the authority of the general director, in accordance with universal and proper law and civil legislation and (2) to be accountable to the general director and to prepare financial reports for the key stakeholders: the Society of Apostolic Life, civil authorities, benefactors and others. (Constitutions 145)

Other New Territorial Directors named Globally

Several other new territorial directors were appointed globally. The new territorial directors are Beatriz (Betty) Rivera, 42, from Mexico, who replaces Ana López, interim territorial director of Spain since Lourdes Santos was appointed as general secretary; and Kate O’Connor, 41 years old and a Canadian, who will replace Elena Bartolomé as territorial director of Brazil. Elena vacated the role when she was elected general councilor by the 2020 General Assembly.

Betty Rivera: New Territorial Director of Spain

Betty Rivera, currently of the Philippines, was born in Monterrey, Mexico, on April 12, 1978 and was consecrated on August 30, 1997. She was a member of ECYD and Regnum Christi before she was consecrated.

She studied a degree in Education and Development at the Universidad Anahuac, and a degree in Religious Studies at the Ateneo Pontificio Regina Apostolorum. She holds a Master’s Degree in Educational Management at the Universidad Anahuac and a Master’s Degree in Theological Studies with a focus on Consecrated Life at Christendom College.

Betty has served as ECYD director in Rhode Island, Mexico City, Michigan and Atlanta. While in Mexico she coordinated the network of girls’ ECYD clubs in the country. She collaborated in the team of the territorial direction of North America in the area of apostolate and in the general secretariat in Rome. She has been principal and assistant principal of Everest School in Manila and is currently in charge of the institutional development of the new school in southern Manila and is the community director of the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi in Manila, local director of Regnum Christi in the Philippines and director of the ladies’ section in the same city.

Kate O’Connor: New Territorial Director of Brazil

Kate O’Connor, the newly appointed territorial director of Brazil,  was born in Stratford, Canada, on February 21, 1979. Her parents, both doctors, are from Trinidad and Tobago. In August 1996, she entered the Pre-candidacy in Rhode Island, USA. On August 29, 1997, she was consecrated, along with her sister Siobhan.

Her initial formation and apostolic assignments were in Brazil and the USA. She has carried out a variety of apostolates in these two countries, in the areas of vocation and university ministry, catechesis, sections of ECYD and Regnum Christi.  Kate was a professor at the Formation Center in Curitiba, Brazil where she taught courses in Dogmatic Theology, Public Speaking and Developmental Psychology. In Houston, Texas she was Dean of Discipline and a member of the administrative team at Northwoods Catholic School, as well as collaborating with the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston in the Office for Vocations and Campus Ministry.  Since 2017, she has been the spiritual director and member of the auxiliary team of women in São Paulo, Brazil and teaches courses in Spirituality and Spiritual Accompaniment.

Kate received her B.A. in Education and Development from Anahuac University in Mexico, her M.A. in Religious Sciences from the Pontifical University Regina Apostolorum in Rome, and a M.A. in Spiritual Theology from the Oblate School of Theology in San Antonio, Texas.  Kate is passionate about art, nature and all expressions of beauty as the language of God.

The territorial director for the territory of Central and Western Europe who will replace Jacinta Curran, who was elected general councilor by the 2020 General Assembly, will be appointed soon, as a wider consultation is being carried out throughout the territory.

 

Kathleen Murphy Appointed as New North American Territorial Director for the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi: Sonia Baldwin Named as General Administrator Read More »

POPE FRANCIS’ MESSAGE TO REGNUM CHRISTI: A new stage on a journey that must continue

February 29, 2020

 

POPE FRANCIS’ MESSAGE TO REGNUM CHRISTI

A new stage on a journey that must continue

 

  • The members of the General Directive College of Regnum Christi thank Pope Francis for the confidence to continue to walk the path of renewal with determination in order to overcome the legacy of Father Maciel.

 

The Pope’s Message to Regnum Christi (original italian)

The Pope’s Message to Regnum Christi (English, unofficial translation)

 

Rome, February 29, 2020 – This Saturday, February 29, an audience that was scheduled for Pope Francis with the participants in the General Chapter of the Legionaries of Christ and the General Assemblies of the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi and the Lay Consecrated Men of Regnum Christi did not take place because for the third consecutive day there were cancellations on the Holy Father’s agenda. The Holy See has published the message that the Pope wanted to address to the attendees, and it has been read in the Assemblies and the Chapter this morning.

A change of mentality to overcome self-referentiality

In his message, the Pope recalled that the criminal life of the founder “had to some extent tainted the charism that the Spirit had originally given to the Church,” affecting the norms, the exercise of government and the life “of all of Regnum Christi.” Regnum Christi, hand in hand with the Church, has travelled a path leading to a real “change of mentality” which has been reflected in the new Constitutions and Statutes, which are “truly new,” says the Pope, “because they reflect a new spirit” and a vision “consistent with the Second Vatican Council,” the result of a work in which “all of your communities have been involved.” The Pope says in his message that “this was possible because you have been docile to the help and support that the Church has offered you,” and because you have realized “the real need for a renewal that would bring you out of the self-referentiality in which you had been enclosed.”

“The words of Pope Francis fill us with gratitude and encourage us to follow the path of discernment and renewal with commitment and docility to the Spirit,” said Nancy Nohrden, General Director of the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi. “The fact that he has confirmed the steps we have taken in recent years strengthens our desire to address with courage and humility the errors of the past, and to walk in truth in order to make the kingdom of Christ present,” she said.

For his part, Félix Gómez Rueda, General Director of the Lay Consecrated Men of Regnum Christi, was grateful “to hear from the Holy Father that the work of these years has allowed us to manifest the charism originally given by the Holy Spirit and truly inserted in the teachings of the Second Vatican Council.”

“We are grateful for the message of the Holy Father and the close accompaniment of the Holy See,” said Father John Connor, LC, recently elected General Director of the Legionaries of Christ. “Aware of what we have learned, recognizing and purifying the painful aspects of our past, we look to the future with hope, seeing a new stage in the journey of renewal that must continue,” he said.

For Francisco Gámez, a lay member who attends the General Directive College of Regnum Christi, “the Pope calls us to have a continuous attitude of spiritual renewal. We, the lay members of Regnum Christi, do not want to live a static charism, nor one that is exclusive to a few. We want to put our charism in contact with reality in a constant discernment, with those who do not know God, with the existential peripheries,” he assured.

 

Regnum Christi Federation

On June 12, 2019, the Holy See, through the Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life (CIVCSVA), constituted the Regnum Christi Federation and approved its Statutes. The new Statutes express the consensus reached by the four vocations of the Regnum Christi during the process of renewal regarding their charism and common mission, spirituality, membership, organization and governance. It has been a participative and global process in which, since 2010, all the members of Regnum Christi from the four vocations that make up this ecclesial reality have been involved, some 22,000, including Legionaries of Christ, Consecrated Women, Lay Consecrated Men and lay members.

 

Collegial Government

Hand in hand with the Church, the mechanisms that regulate the exercise of government and authority have been reformed as indicated by the Holy See after the apostolic visit in 2010, “united to the truth, to respect conscience and to be exercised in the light of the Gospel as an authentic ecclesial service.” In addition to the changes in the particular constitutions of the three consecrated vocations, Regnum Christi has introduced a collegial mode of government for the Federation. In this way, it seeks to highlight the spirit of communion, co-responsibility and complementarity of the vocations while respecting the autonomy proper to each.

 

Regnum Christi by the Numbers

Worldwide, at the end of 2018, Regnum Christi had 22,652 lay members, 523 Consecrated Women, 59 Lay Consecrated Men and 1,501 Legionaries of Christ.

Regnum Christi’s educational institutions have 185,000 students including 14 civil universities in Mexico, Italy, Spain, Chile and the United States, and 154 schools (31 of which are Mano Amiga schools for children from marginalized areas of Mexico, Chile, Argentina, the Philippines, Venezuela, Colombia and Brazil). In addition, Regnum Christi directs the Pontifical Athenaeum Regina Apostolorum, the John Paul II Institute for the Family in Mexico, the Pontifical International College Maria Mater Ecclesiae in Rome and the Maria Mater Ecclesiae Seminary in Brazil.

 

Evangelization Missions

Thousands of families and young people put themselves completely at the service of collaborating in evangelization with diocesan parish priests, especially during Holy Week and summer months. There are missionaries from 30 countries: United States, El Salvador, Venezuela, Chile, Colombia, Brazil, Argentina, Cuba, Ivory Coast, Poland, New Zealand, Australia, Romania, Hungary, Philippines, Canada, Belize, Italy, France, Spain, Mexico, Ireland, Germany, Bosnia, Bahamas, Lebanon, England, Austria, Belgium and Lithuania.

POPE FRANCIS’ MESSAGE TO REGNUM CHRISTI: A new stage on a journey that must continue Read More »

Message of His Holiness Pope Francis to the Regnum Christi Federation: Unofficial Translation from Italian Original

ADDRESS OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS

to the Regnum Christi Federation

February 29 2020

(Unofficial translation from the Italian original)

Dear brothers and sisters,

I am pleased to be able to meet with you as you are concluding a phase of your journey under the maternal guidance of the Church. You, Legionaries of Christ, have just concluded your General Chapter and you, both Consecrated Women and Lay Consecrated Men of Regnum Christi, your General Assemblies. These were a chapter and assemblies which produced your new General Governments, concluding a phase in the journey you have undertaken. This means that the journey continues and is not yet completed.

The criminal behavior of your founder, Fr. Marcial Maciel Degollado, which emerged in all its gravity, produced a deep crisis in the whole of Regnum Christi, both as an institution and individually. While, on the one hand, it cannot be denied that he was the “historical” founder of the entire reality you represent, on the other hand, he cannot be considered as an example of holiness to be imitated. He made himself the point of reference, through a false image that he created with his double life. Moreover, his long centralized government had, to some extent, tainted the charism that the Holy Spirit had originally given to the Church; and this was reflected in its norms, as well as in the practice of government and obedience, and in its style of life.

Faced with these revelations, the Church did not fail to show her motherly concern and reached out to you in various ways, placing alongside you people of great human and pastoral sensitivity and recognized juridical competence. Among them I wish to recall the late Cardinal Velasio De Paolis, Pontifical Delegate. The new Constitutions and the new Statutes are truly “new,” both because they reflect a new spirit and a new vision of religious life consistent with the Second Vatican Council and the guidelines of the Holy See, and because they are the product of three years’ work, in which all of your communities have been involved and which has led to a change of mentality. It was an event that brought about a real conversion of heart and mind. This was possible because you were docile to the help and support that the Church offered you, having realized the real need for a renewal that would bring you out of the self-referentiality in which you had been enclosed.  You opened yourselves with courage to the action of the Holy Spirit, thus entering the path of true discernment.

Accompanied by the Church, you have carried out with patience and willingness a demanding task to overcome even very strong tensions which sometimes arose. This prompted a further change of mentality, because it required a new vision in the mutual relations between the diverse realities that comprise Regnum Christi. I know well that it has not been easy, because what we are most strongly attached to are our own ideas. We often lack holy indifference, to which we must be open by an act of will, to allow the Holy Spirit to work within us. The Spirit leads us to detachment from ourselves in the search for God’s will, because only from God’s will can come the good for the whole Church and for each of us.

This work has led to the establishment of the Federation of Regnum Christi, composed of the Religious Institute of the Legionaries of Christ, the Society of Apostolic Life of the Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi and the Society of Apostolic Life of the Lay Consecrated Men of Regnum Christi. Numerous lay people, who do not profess the evangelical counsels, join this Federation individually, thus constituting a “Spiritual Family,” a broader reality than the Federation itself. The Federation is a canonically “new,” but also an “old” reality, because this unity and autonomy was already existent, in fact, since 2014. There remains a vast area which must be the subject of continued discernment on your part. Therefore, the journey must continue, looking forward, not backwards. Look back only to find confidence in God’s support, which has never been lacking.

At hand is the question of determining the concrete application of the Statutes of the Federation. This requires the discernment of both the collegial governing bodies, and the general and territorial governments of the three federated realities. The Statutes must always stimulate discernment. However, if discernment is not easy on a personal level, it is much less so on the level of  government. Discernment requires of everyone humility and prayer; the latter, nourished by contemplation of the mysteries of the life of Jesus, leads one to become more like Him and to see through His eyes. In this way, you can progress with objectivity, with a healthy detachment from your own ideas: this does not mean that you should not have your own evaluation of reality and the problems to be confronted, but it means submitting your personal opinion to the common good.

You have elected the new general superiors and their councils. Certainly, the first person responsible for the direction of the Legionaries of Christ or the Consecrated women or the Lay Consecrated Men of Regnum Christi are the directors, but the councils have a very important function, even if the counselors are not superiors.  In fact, the councils must be a valid help to the superiors in their government, but at the same time, they also have a responsibility to supervise the work of these superiors. In fact, they are called to govern with respect for persons and in keeping with the common law of the Church and the proper law of the Institute or of each Society. For this reason, canon law provides that when a matter is submitted to the consent of the council, the superior does not vote, precisely in order to leave the councilors with more freedom (cf. can. 627 §2; 127 CIC; Pont. Commission for the Authentic Interpretation of the Code of Canon Law, response of August 1, 1985, in AAS 77 [1985] 771).

I hope that your new governments will be aware that the journey of renewal is not over, because a change of mentality in individuals and in an institution requires a great deal of time for assimilation, and therefore a continuous conversion. It is a change that must continue in all members of the Federation. To return to the past would be dangerous and meaningless. The individual governments of the three federated institutes are called to follow this path with perseverance and patience, both with regard to their own Religious Institute or Society of Apostolic Life and with regard to the Federation and the laity associated to it. This requires that the three governments have a vision consistent with the will that the Church has shown in all these years by her closeness and by all the concrete means she has put at your disposition.

You, members of the new general governments, have received a mandate from the Church to continue the path of renewal, reaping and strengthening the fruits matured in these years. I exhort you to act fortiter et suaviter: energetically in the substance, and gently in the form, knowing how to grasp with courage, and at the same time with prudence, the other paths that must be taken, which have been outlined and approved by the Church. If you humbly place yourselves in the school of the Holy Spirit, you will not be overwhelmed by fear or doubt, which disturb the soul and prevent action. I entrust you to the motherly protection of the Virgin Mary; I accompany you with my affection and a sure place in my prayers, and from my heart I impart to you the Apostolic Blessing, which I extend to the whole Family of Regnum Christi. And please do not forget to pray for me.

 

Message of His Holiness Pope Francis to the Regnum Christi Federation: Unofficial Translation from Italian Original Read More »

Fr. Eduardo Robles-Gil: Letter about Venezuela

Rome, January 25, 2019

To the members of Regnum Christi

 

Dear friends in Christ,

 

I send you warm greetings, accompanied by my prayers and best wishes for each one of you.

I think we are all aware of the delicate situation that Venezuela is in and all that has been happening in that beloved country, particularly during the last few days.

I am writing to ask you that we continue being united in intense and confident prayer, asking that God grant special graces and gifts to the Venezuelan people and, in particular, to those who have in their hands the possibility of making the country recover constitutional order and take up once more the path of hope, justice, peace and progress.

To Venezuelans and all those who dedicate themselves daily to working on the apostolate in that country, I reiterate that, as a family, you can count on the support and prayers of all members of Regnum Christi. Do not lose hope and confidence that God will know how to move Venezuela forward. I send you my priestly blessing with heartfelt affection.

 

Placing us all once again under the care and protection of Mary Most Holy, I remain affectionately yours in Christ,

Fr. Eduardo Robles-Gil, LC

Original Letter in Spanish

Fr. Eduardo Robles-Gil: Letter about Venezuela Read More »

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Alex Kucera

Atlanta

Alex Kucera has lived in Atlanta, GA, for the last 46 years. He is one of 9 children, married to his wife Karmen, and has 3 girls, one grandson, and a granddaughter on the way. Alex joined Regnum Christi in 2007. Out of the gate, he joined the Helping Hands Medical Missions apostolate and is still participating today with the Ghana Friendship Mission.

In 2009, Alex was asked to be the Atlanta RC Renewal Coordinator for the Atlanta Locality to help the RC members with the RC renewal process. Alex became a Group Leader in 2012 for four of the Atlanta Men’s Section Teams and continues today. Running in parallel, in 2013, Alex became a Team Leader and shepherded a large team of good men.

Alex was honored to be the Atlanta Mission Coordinator between 2010 to 2022 (12 years), coordinating 5-8 Holy Week Mission teams across Georgia. He also created and coordinated missions at a parish in Athens, GA, for 9 years. Alex continues to coordinate Holy Week Missions, Advent Missions, and Monthly missions at Good Shepherd Catholic Church in Cumming, GA.

From 2016 to 2022, Alex also served as the Men’s Section Assistant in Atlanta. He loved working with the Men’s Section Director, the Legionaries, Consecrated, and Women’s Section leadership teams.

Alex is exceptionally grateful to the Legionaries, Consecrated, and many RC members who he’s journeyed shoulder to shoulder, growing his relationship with Christ and others along the way. He knows that there is only one way, that’s Christ’s Way, with others!